Columbia University student studies with New College professor over winter break

The New College of ASU's West campus focuses on liberal arts and science college degree programs.
The New College of ASU’s West campus focuses on liberal arts and science college degree programs.

UPDATE (June 20, 2016): Ewoma Ogbaudu has been accepted into Columbia’s SPURS (Summer Program for Under-Represented Students) biomedical research program and will be conducting research on LAM disease, which is similar to lung cancer, this summer. In addition, his principal investigator is going to allow Ewoma to continue conducting research in her lab during the school year. Congrats again to New College grad Ewoma Ogbaudu!

Original story below:


Albert Einstein once said “try not to become a man of success, but rather try to become a man of value.” Ewoma Ogbaudu displays that drive for success and self-value everyday. Ogbaudu attended the Research and Engineering Apprenticeship Program (REAP) as New College Professor Dr. Lara Ferry. When the two connected, he landed a volunteering position at Dr. Ferry’s research lab, and completed over 200 hours in the lab the summer before he was heading off to Columbia University in New York. Since then, he has sustained his loyalty to New College, returning to Dr. Ferry’s lab whenever he has the chance.


Ewoma is currently studying pre-med at Columbia with a focus on public health. Working with Dr. Ferry is helping him learn and understand techniques in the lab. Working on analyzing the kissing gourami with Dr. Ferry has prepared him for future research work. The project he will be working on at Columbia will be on neurogenesis and mice, specifically how stress effects the brain functions.

Flag football team represents West campus in regional tournament at UCLA

16928719221_89f6cf6c1d_o New college sophomore Greg Rincon and his flag football team took their talents to the beach this fall, earning a spot in a regional tournament played at UCLA. After an undefeated season against fellow West campus teams, the southern California native and his team participated in the NIRSA Regional Tournament 7 on 7, featuring teams from other universities around the region, including four from ASU. Greg and his team finished in the top-8 out of 28 teams, qualifying for the playoffs on Sunday, where their journey ultimately came to an end.


“Meeting the other football players from where they are from, it was nice. Everyone was nice to each other, we were all there for one reason, to win the tournament, so it was cool meeting new people and having them have the same interest as us, and we can all just be there to play football. That was the most fun part about it.” Greg said.


Greg expressed so proudly about his and the team’s experience as being part of the flag football league in West campus’ intramural system. The intramural system is still relatively young at West, but steadily growing, as more and more teams sign up to compete in every sport. This gives the students the chance to interact with other students on campus that share similar interest and passion.


“I think its very helpful to join an intramural team because you do get a team skill from it, you have to work as a team.” Greg said.


For more information on ASU West’s intramural leagues, please click on this link.

New College professor consulted on ruling in Lumosity case

Zach ShipsteadNew College assistant professor Zach Shipstead’s knowledge and research in working memory capacity was brought to the forefront recently after a large fine was levied to an online memory game company.


 

“Brain training” website Lumosity was fined $2 million earlier this month by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) after the company claimed their online games could help users reduce or delay cognitive impairment due to age or other serious health conditions, to which there is no documented research to confirm their assertions. The company promoted the service through TV and radio advertisements, as well as through email and social media campaigns, selling online or mobile subscriptions for $14.95/month or lifetime memberships for $299.95. Along with the lack of research to back up their claims of cognitive improvement, the company failed to disclose that consumer testimonials were acquired through contests that featured large-scale prizes.


The Huffington Post’s live-streaming network, Huffpost Live, featured Professor Shipstead in a panel discussion about the fine, and the company’s claims about improving memory and brain function. You can watch the discussion here.

25th anniversary of the MLK Day March on West

TEMPE - January 20th, 2016 - ASU Now - West Campus -  Charles St. Clair performs Martin Luther King Jr's "I Have a Dream" speech during the March on West Campus Wednesday morning January 20th, 2016. This is the 25th anniversary following its' start as a protest when former Arizona governor Evan Mecham promised to cancel the paid holiday in 1987. Photo by Deanna Dent/ASU Now
TEMPE – January 20th, 2016 – ASU Now – West Campus – Charles St. Clair performs Martin Luther King Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech during the March on West Campus Wednesday morning January 20th, 2016. This is the 25th anniversary following its’ start as a protest when former Arizona governor Evan Mecham promised to cancel the paid holiday in 1987. Photo by Deanna Dent/ASU Now

For the 25th consecutive year, ASU’s West campus celebrated Martin Luther King Day with the annual “March on West” on Wednesday, Jan. 20, 2016. Over 500 6th-8th grade students from nine area schools participated, learning about the struggle for equality in cities such as Selma, AL, Memphis, TN, and Little Rock, AR before going on a march through West campus. Faculty-member Charles St. Clair performed a recreation of MLK’s legendary “I Have a Dream” speech in the Kiva Courtyard, and the Moon Valley High School choir gave moving renditions of the “Star Spangled Banner,” the “Black National Anthem,” and “We Shall Overcome.”


For more on the historic event, please watch Phoenix NBC-affiliate 12News’ coverage here.

Forensic detective: New College professor helping solve 1984 cold case

Dr. Tony Falsetti working with skull remains.
Dr. Tony Falsetti working with skull remains.

New College forensics professor Tony Falsetti is helping the state of Wisconsin solve a 1984 murder case that went cold long ago. An unidentified woman was found at the side of a dirt road with massive trauma to her head and her hands cut off, but her skull was able to be partially recovered. The state sent the remains of the victim’s skull from Wisconsin to ASU’s West campus, and with the aide of a forensics student, Dr. Falsetti reconstructed the skull and utilized 3D facial imaging technology to get an image of what the woman would have looked like at the time of her murder.

Jane Doe digital reconstruction image. (Photo: Maricopa County Attorney’s Office)
Jane Doe digital reconstruction image. (Photo: Maricopa County Attorney’s Office)


KTAR in Phoenix recently interviewed Dr. Falsetti about this case, which can be found here. To find out more about New College’s forensics program, please click here.

Visiting professor Harry Brighouse to talk about the philosophical views in “Family Values” in February

Harry Brighouse, professor of philosophy and affiliate professor of educational policy studies; director of the Center for Ethics and Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is pictured on Feb. 17, 2015. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)
Harry Brighouse, professor of philosophy and affiliate professor of educational policy studies; director of the Center for Ethics and Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, is pictured on Feb. 17, 2015. (Photo by Bryce Richter / UW-Madison)

New College is honored to announce a well-known public intellectual Professor and Author, Mr. Harry Brighouse, will be joining us to give a stimulating lecture on family values. Mr. Brighouse is a Professor of Philosophy and an Affiliate Professor of Educational Policy Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He is also a regular contributor to the blog Crooked Timber. Mr. Brighouse will talk about “Family Values”, a book that he co-authored with Adam Swift, that puts forward a bold set of philosophical questions: What makes the family a valuable social unit? Who has a right to be a parent? And what rights parents should and should not have over their children?


“Identifying the proper content of ‘family values’ is, for us, the first step toward working out a normative theory of the family,” Brighouse says.

He will discuss the morality of different kinds of advantages and benefits that come from the methods of parenting, such as reading a bedtime story, sending the child to the finest private school, or through a direct transfer of wealth. He will also talk about the ways society can or should regulate the advantages.


“Only by thinking carefully about why it is good for children to be raised by parents,” Brighouse says, “and good for parents to raise children, can we derive a satisfying and appropriately detailed understanding of the morality of family life.” Mr. Brighouse has recently published another book, The Aims of Higher Education: Problems of Morality and Justice. He will be talking to the New College faculty at SBS about his work of justice in higher education, which is what the book is based on. He will also run a workshop for faculty on pedagogical questions related to teaching inequality.


The event will be held on Feb. 11, 2016 from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m. at ASU’s West campus: 4701 W Thunderbird Rd Glendale, AZ 85306, in the CLCC building, room 229. For any questions or further information, please contact Dave Hunt at 602-543-4521 or dave.hunt@asu.edu.

Great schedule of spring artistic events on West campus is set

artspace-west-14ASU’s West campus will host a variety of artistic events throughout the spring semester. From faculty members, to guest artists, and even ASU students, an incredible collection of artistic galleries and dramatic performances will illuminate the West campus’ unique art scene.

The full schedule is as follows:


Arctic Transitions:  In the Age of Carbon. Feb. 3-25, 2016. Opening reception on Feb. 3 at 6:00 p.m. at ArtSpace West. Using carbon fiber rods as sonic and visual elements that pick up the sounds of wind, generating harmonics, as well as other sounds of nature, IAP faculty Richard Lerman has created a three-channel sound/video installation recorded in the Arctic regions of Finland, Norway, Sweden and Russia. The piece explores issues of climate change and its effects in the Arctic. All the work was gathered using his self-built microphones along with a hydrophone.


Not Drowning, Waverley. Feb. 3 – Apr. 14, 2016. Opening reception on Feb. 3 at 6:00 p.m. at ArtSpace West. Based in Bondi, Australia, guest artist photographer Andrew Worssam has taken a digital smartphone and mixed it with an analog pair of binoculars to create some quite unexpected photographs. Often specializing in architectural photography, his work studies relationships: between light and form, space and time, built-form and context. Worssam will present a selection of photographs and be in residence to talk about his work.


Passing Strange. Feb. 18-21, 2016. Shows start at 7:30 p.m. Feb. 18-20, and at 3:00 on Feb. 21. at Second Stage West. Directed by IAP faculty Jeff Kennedy, this unique rock musical tells the story of a young African American’s artistic journey of self-discovery, beginning in South Central Los Angeles and traveling to Amsterdam and Berlin.  Complicated by his need to rebel against his mother and society, he “passes” through place to place and from lover to lover, his experiences shaped by his black, American, and middle-class identity as he seeks to find “the real.” This in the Southwest premiere of this 2008 Tony Award-winner for Best Book of a Musical and is presented as a co-production with iTheatre Collaborative. This production is for mature audiences only. Tickets are $10 General, $7 Seniors, $5 Students, faculty, staff and are available in advance at www.brownpapertickets.com.


Los Jovenes: El Futuro. March 23 – Apr. 14, 2016. Opening reception on March 23 at 6:00 p.m. at ArtSpace West. This  installation from IAP faculty member Patricia Clark is of new works in video, photography and print that present the ways in which the youth culture in Cuba has developed over the past eighteen years. This will include the premiere of the first in a series of interactive Live Books, with paper technology, touchscreen video and embedded audio enlivening the experience of the stories told within it covers.


Second Stage West One Acts. April 7-10, 2016. Shows start at 7:30 p.m. April 7-9, and at 3:00 p.m. on April 10 at Second Stage West. Programming still TBD.